Themes – Mianogen

If you are like me and you love to customize your smartphone (you’ll achieve much more customization features once you’ve rooted and installed a custom rom on your phone), you will find this theme very neat and classy.

Ladies and gentleman, I present to you “Mianogen” theme, made by Recognized Contributor “tung91“.

Screenshot_2013-01-22-19-31-30

Please note that these screenshots are made on a Paranoid Android ROM, with a tweaked DPI – so you will not get the same scheme for status bar, settings, sms app but you will get the same great graphics look.

Tung91 choose to replace the stock icons in AOSP ROM’s with Google JKF ones – a very smart move if you will. Those icons are so great, I wonder why Google didn’t implemented those in their Android versions until now. They are used in numerous Google apps around the world wide web, such as Google Calendar. You can find other Google icons in their G+ account: Here

As far as what made Tung91 to make this new theme, he quickly briefs us:

I just help my friend to make a CM theme and he want to make it simple as original, but replace some stock resource with MIUI’s resource to avoid “boring” and change to my favourite color – blue …. maybe you like it too , or not , but i’m just sharing it here.

Screenshot_2013-01-22-19-32-09As you can see in the above screenshot, he made a clean black background with a blue line – to match the stock ICS/Jellybean theme. The icons from the status bar are simple but yet powerful reworked. I personally like the battery icon, it seems like one of the UCCW widgets made around the xda forums. Please note that the status bar color is stock background color – which is BLACK, but as I am using PA rom, I modified the color to match more with this theme. You’ll probably tempted to say that this theme has nothing gray in it.

Until now…

In the next screenshot you will see pièce de résistance! The background of the Settings application is just beautiful! It matches so well with the JFK Icon, blue lines and with the small icons that are featured for every single setting you can make for your phone.

Screenshot_2013-01-22-19-32-29

Let me tell you something. I am a custom ROM lover from around 2009. All my smartphones we’re rooted and boosted with custom ROMs in first two-three weeks, so I installed a lot of Themes for CM7/CM9/CM10 and I was yet to find one that I would keep for more than one week. But this theme captured me in its simplicity that I am amazed I was not temped to move to another one. Indeed, you can bring a lot of arguments, there are a lot of themes and you can easily find the one you like the most, but for me, this is the right theme to go with if you are into minimalistic stuff.

There is also a PAID version for this theme if you want to support the developer – it can be similar with the free version or it can be slightly modified. Also, Tung91 is so nice, that he made also a “paid” version – it is a link to his paypal account and he stated that you can buy the theme with your own price. You pay how much you want, he receives the payment and he will provide you a download link for the paid version. Pretty great if you ask me. The reason for this “pay how much you like” action is that, he wants to raise money to buy a One X phone.

So go check this theme, here on xda forums and if you really love it as much as I do, please do pay how much you want to support the developer who is actually paying a lot of time and resources into making your favourite smartphone to look sleek.

This theme was proudly presented to you by DroidVoid team, until the next time, Flash’n’Customize, my friends!

Kernels(Governors, I/O Schedulers)

First off, you all should know that EVERYTHING pretty much has a kernel.

Second, there are a total of about 20-25 Governors in total about now, maybe 21-22.

List that One V currently have

  • 1) Ondemand
  • 2)Conservative
  • 3) Interactive
  • 4) Interactivex
  • 5) SmartassV2 
  • 6) Lionheart
  • 7) SavagedZen
  • 8) Powersave
  • 9) Performance
  • 10) Scary

 Ondemand:
Default governor in almost all stock kernels. One main goal of the ondemand governor is to switch to max frequency as soon as there is a CPU activity detected to ensure the responsiveness of the system. Effectively, it uses the CPU busy time as the answer to “how critical is performance right now” question. So Ondemand jumps to maximum frequency when CPU is busy and decreases the frequency gradually when CPU is less loaded/apporaching idle.

Conservative:
A slower Ondemand which scales up slowly to save battery. The conservative governor is based on the ondemand governor. It functions like the Ondemand governor by dynamically adjusting frequencies based on processor utilization. However, the conservative governor increases and decreases CPU speed more gradually. Simply put, this governor increases the frequency step by step on CPU load and jumps to lowest frequency on CPU idle.

Interactive:
Can be considered a faster ondemand. So more snappier, less battery. Interactive is designed for latency-sensitive, interactive workloads. Instead of sampling at every interval like ondemand, it determines how to scale up when CPU comes out of idle.

Interactivex:
This is an Interactive governor with a wake profile. More battery friendly than interactive.

SmartassV2:
Version 2 of the original smartass governor from Erasmux. Another favorite for many a people. The governor aim for an “ideal frequency”, and ramp up more aggressively towards this freq and less aggressive after. It uses different ideal frequencies for screen on and screen off, namely awake_ideal_freq and sleep_ideal_freq. This governor scales down CPU very fast (to hit sleep_ideal_freq soon) while screen is off and scales up rapidly to awake_ideal_freq (500 mhz for GS2 by default) when screen is on. There’s no upper limit for frequency while screen is off (unlike Smartass). So the entire frequency range is available for the governor to use during screen-on and screen-off state. The motto of this governor is a balance between performance and battery

 Lionheart:
Lionheart is a conservative-based governor which is based on samsung’s update3 source. Tweaks comes from 1) Knzo 2) Morfic. The original idea comes from Netarchy. The governor behaves more like the performance one, at the cost of battery as the scaling is very aggressive

SavagedZen:
Another smartassV2 based governor. Achieves good balance between performance & battery as compared to brazilianwax.

Performance:
Sets min frequency as max frequency. Use this while benchmarking!.

 Powersave:
Locks max frequency to min frequency. Can not be used as a screen-on or even screen-off (if scaling min frequency is too low).

Scary – A new governor wrote based on conservative with some smartass features, it scales accordingly to conservatives laws. So it will start from the bottom, take a load sample, if it’s above the upthreshold, ramp up only one speed at a time, and ramp down one at a time. It will automatically cap the off screen speeds to 245Mhz, and if your min freq is higher than 245mhz, it will reset the min to 120mhz while screen is off and restore it upon screen awakening, and still scale accordingly to conservatives laws. So it spends most of its time at lower frequencies. The goal of this is to get the best battery life with decent performance. It will give the same performance as conservative right now, it will get tweaked over time.

That’s all for Governors. Now, if you want to read more, you can read on: Here

I/O Schedulers

Q. “What purposes does an i/o scheduler serve?”
A.

  • Minimize hard disk seek latency.
  • Prioritize I/O requests from processes.
  • Allocate disk bandwidth for running processes.
  • Guarantee that certain requests will be served before a deadline.

1) Noop

Inserts all the incoming I/O requests to a First In First Out queue and implements request merging. Best used with storage devices that does not depend on mechanical movement to access data (yes, like our flash drives). Advantage here is that flash drives does not require reordering of multiple I/O requests unlike in normal hard drives.

Advantages:

  • Serves I/O requests with least number of cpu cycles. (Battery friendly?)
  • Best for flash drives since there is no seeking penalty.
  • Good throughput on db systems.

Disadvantages:

  • Reduction in number of cpu cycles used is proportional to drop in performance.

2) Deadline

Goal is to minimize I/O latency or starvation of a request. The same is achieved by round robin policy to be fair among multiple I/O requests. Five queues are aggressively used to reorder incoming requests.

Advantages:

  • Nearly a real time scheduler.
  • Excels in reducing latency of any given single I/O.
  • Best scheduler for database access and queries.
  • Bandwidth requirement of a process – what percentage of CPU it needs, is easily calculated.
  • Like noop, a good scheduler for solid state/flash drives.

Disadvantages:

  • When system is overloaded, set of processes that may miss deadline is largely unpredictable.

3) CFQ

Completely Fair Queuing scheduler maintains a scalable per-process I/O queue and attempts to distribute the available I/O bandwidth equally among all I/O requests. Each per-process queue contains synchronous requests from processes. Time slice allocated for each queue depends on the priority of the ‘parent’ process. V2 of CFQ has some fixes which solves process’ i/o starvation and some small backward seeks in the hope of improving responsiveness.

Advantages:

  • Considered to deliver a balanced i/o performance.
  • Easiest to tune.
  • Excels on multiprocessor systems.
  • Best database system performance after deadline.

Disadvantages:

  • Some users report media scanning takes longest to complete using CFQ. This could be because of the property that since the bandwidth is equally distributed to all i/o operations during boot-up, media scanning is not given any special priority.
  • Jitter (worst-case-delay) exhibited can sometimes be high, because of the number of tasks competing for the disk.

4) BFQ

Instead of time slices allocation by CFQ, BFQ assigns budgets. Disk is granted to an active process until it’s budget (number of sectors) expires. BFQ assigns high budgets to non-read tasks. Budget assigned to a process varies over time as a function of it’s behavior.

Advantages:

  • Believed to be very good for usb data transfer rate.
  • Believed to be the best scheduler for HD video recording and video streaming. (because of less jitter as compared to CFQ and others)
  • Considered an accurate i/o scheduler.
  • Achieves about 30% more throughput than CFQ on most workloads.

Disadvantages:

  • Not the best scheduler for benchmarking.
  • Higher budget assigned to a process can affect interactivity and increased latency.

5) SIO

Simple I/O scheduler aims to keep minimum overhead to achieve low latency to serve I/O requests. No priority quesues concepts, but only basic merging. Sio is a mix between noop & deadline. No reordering or sorting of requests.

Advantages:

  • Simple, so reliable.
  • Minimized starvation of requests.

Disadvantages:

  • Slow random-read speeds on flash drives, compared to other schedulers.
  • Sequential-read speeds on flash drives also not so good.

And that be all…. All credits to DroidPhile. Give his thread a look for more.

Understanding Your Android better / Glossary

Have you been in a position in which:

  • you want to show off an application on your phone and your phone refuses to respond
  • you wanted to call/message some one and your phone refuses to help you

and you abuse the hell out of your phone?

Well, I guess what we have all been in that particular situation and then we google out remedies to fix our phone revealing the other side of the medal: Rooting. Curiosity is known to humans so you just click on the first and second link, download a file and run it and 2 things of the following happens:

  • You were lucky enough to root it without screwing it.
  • Boom your phones screwed, it wont start.

So now you’re searching for a solution for this problem (unless you are the kind of person who is willing to spend a ton of cash to replace the motherboard)

Now for people searching for a solution, usually end up putting a question in the forums. In there, people post all these terms which you have no idea off, and when you ask them they get pissed (well i am one of them :p)

So i created this post with all  the terms you will ever need to know about rooting and a brief explanation about them, so that next time when some one says you have to flash your phone you wont ask whats flashing.

The Main Question- what is ROOTING

Android is based on Linux. On Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems, the root user is equivalent to the Administrator user on Windows. The root user has access to the entire operating system and can do anything. By default, you don’t have root access to your Android device(to prevent us from screwing with our phone), and certain apps won’t function without root access.

With root access, you can disable the bloatware(Samsung fun,htc skins,Motorola stuff,etc) that comes with your phone, manually deny app permissions, run a firewall, access the entire file system, or tether your device, even if tethering functionality has been disabled. You’ll find many apps that require root access in the Google Play store ,Even if they install on your unrooted phone they won’t function until you root your device.

The Most Basic Terms(they are in alphabetical order)

ADB:Android Debug Bridge

It is a versatile command line tool that lets you communicate with an emulator instance or connected Android-powered device. It is a client-server program that includes three components:

•A client, which runs on your development machine. You can invoke a client from a shell by issuing an adb command. Other Android tools such as the ADT plugin and DDMS also create adb clients.
•A server, which runs as a background process on your development machine. The server manages communication between the client and the adb daemon running on an emulator or device.
•A daemon, which runs as a background process on each emulator or device instance.

Android

A Linux-based operating system for mobile devices(smart phones).Versions are alphabetically codenamed after deserts:- Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly bean.

APK

Android application package file (APK) is the file format used to distribute and install application software and middleware onto Google’s Android operating system.

Bootloader

This small program’s only job is to load other data and programs which are then executed from RAM.Often, multiple-stage boot loaders are used, during which several programs of increasing complexity load one after the other in a process of chain loading.Bootloader increases the security of the phone preventing us from rooting, although companies like HTC provide a devloper site to help us unlock the bootloader

Bootloop

When your system recycles over and over without entering the main OS.(when u cant get pass the welcome screen)

Custom(ROM,KERNEL,APPS)

Independent developers who like to customize their devices beyond the standard options provided often tend to release their labor for the rest to enjoy, in form of custom ROMs,etc

Cache

Cache is used by the central processing unit of a device to reduce the average time to access memory. The cache is a smaller, faster memory which stores copies of the data from the most frequently used main memory locations. As long as most memory accesses are cached memory locations, the average latency of memory accesses will be closer to the cache latency than to the latency of main memory.

Dual Core

A dual core processor is a central processing unit (CPU) that has two separate cores , each with its own cache. It essentially is two microprocessors in one. This type of CPU is widely available from many manufacturers. Other types of multi-core processors also have been developed, including quad-core processors with four cores each, hexa-core processors with six, octa-core processors with eight and many-core processors with an even larger number of cores.

Dalvik

This is The Android platform’s virtual machine.The Dalvik VM is an interpreter-only virtual machine that executes files in the Dalvik Executable (“.dex”) format, a format that is optimized for efficient storage and memory-mappable execution.

Dalvik Cache

Writable cache that contains the optimized bytecode of all apk files (apps) on your Android device. Having the information in it’s own cache makes applications load faster and perform better.(its where the apps store their stuff)

FC/FC’s

Short for “force close,” meaning an app that has crashed.(like when firefox closes unexpectedly)

Fastboot

A diagnostic protocol used primarily to modify the flash filesystem in Android smartphones from another computer over a USB connection. It is part of the Android Debug Bridge library.
Utilizing the Fastboot protocol requires that the device be started in a boot loader or Second Program Loader mode in which only the most basic hardware initialization is performed. After enabling the protocol on the device itself it will accept any command sent to it over USB via a command line. Some of most commonly used fastboot commands include:

  • fastboot reboot (reboots)
  • fastboot devices(displays the devices connected)
  • fastboot flash boot boot.img(installs the kernels)
  • fastboot flash recovery recovery.img (installs the recovery)
  • fastboot erase cache (Erases the cache partition)

Flashing

It basically means installing.The ROM memory used in smartphones and tablets etc. is often same as flash memory found in SD cards and USB flash drives, simply optimized for better speed and performance while running the operating system

Hboot

It’s mainly responsible for checking and initializing the hardware and starting the phone’s software. It can also be used for flashing official software releases, as well as a few other things. HBoot can be compared to the BIOS on a computer.

Kernel(a link between the hardware and OS)

A kernel is a layer of code that allows the OS and applications to interface with your phone’s hardware. The degree in which you can access your phone’s hardware features depends on the quality of code in the kernel. The homebrew (rooting) community for HTC has made several kernel code improvements that give us additional features from our hardware that the stock kernel does not. When you flash a custom ROM, you automatically get a kernel. But you can also flash a standalone kernel ROM on top of the existing one, effectively overwriting it. These days, the difference in custom kernels is less about new features and more about alternate configurations. Choosing a custom kernel is basically choosing one that works best with your ROM.

Nandroid

Nandroid is used to backup or restore backups from Recovery.Its a must for first time users,Cause if anything goes wrong u can just restore it.

Recovery

The recovery partition is a boot-mode for your phone that allows you to wipe your settings from the Data partition of the phone, or perform an update using an update.zip file on the root of the microSD card. It is common  to flash a patched Recovery image, such as TWRP or ClockworkMod Recovery. This allows you to run Nandroid backup from the device, and flash modifications, such as files to the device, essentially becoming a means to install software to the device. Recovery mode is separate from ‘normal’ mode, and can be entered by holding down home whilst turning the phone on.

ROM

A ROM is a modified version of Android. It may contain extra features, a different look, speed enhancements, or even a version of Android that hasn’t been released yet

RUU and SBF

ROM Upgrade Utilities(RUU) (for HTC phones) and System Boot Files(SBF) (for Motorola phones) are files direct from the manufacturer that change the software on your phone. RUU and SBF files are how the manufacturers deliver your over-the-air upgrades, and modders often post leaked RUU and SBF files for flashing when the updates haven’t been released yet. They’re also handy when downgrading your phone, if a rooting method isn’t available for the newest software version yet. You can flash RUUs right from your HTC phone, but Motorola users will need a Windows program called RSD Lite to flash SBF files.

Superuser/SU

On many computer operating systems, the superuser is a special user account used for system administration. Depending on the operating system, the actual name of this account might be : root, administrator or0 supervisor.

S-ON AND S-OFF

S-On:Security on,means no access to the phones operating system.

S-Off:Security was exploited,now have access to the operating system.

Ok guys, these are the most basic terms you should know about before you go ahead and root your phone. If you have doubts, questions, ask in the comments section below!

Suggest this BLOG to other users if you found it useful. Thank you!

Most credits go to

  • Google
  • Wikipedia
  • How to geek
  • Lifehacker
  • Xda forums